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Working In the United Kingdom (UK)

It is highly advisable for every student to be aware of the working laws and eligibility requirements about working in United Kingdom.<br /> As per UK Employment Rights, you will need to apply for National Insurance number before or after you start any work. Aelia Masumi
February 24, 2011
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It is highly advisable for every student to be aware of the working laws and eligibility requirements about working in United Kingdom.

In this page...
National Insurance Number
The National Minimum Wage
Rules for International Students
Government check on discrimination
Read More

National Insurance Number (NI)
As per UK Employment Rights, you will need to apply for National Insurance number before or after you start any work. You should not be taxed at all if you are a student and earning under a certain amount.

How to apply for NI?
Dial 0845 6000643 between 08:00-18:00 (Monday to Friday) to make an appointment for NI number interview. To save your time and trip, it's a good idea to check the documentation required to get NI number.

The National Minimum Wage
Almost everyone who legally works in the UK is entitled to receive a minimum level of pay. This is called the national minimum wage. The national minimum wage is set by the government each year based on the recommendations of independent Low Pay Commission (LPC).
All workers in the UK aged 16 or over are legally entitled to be paid a minimum amount per hour. This is in spite of the kind of work they do or the size and type of company.

The rates from 1 October 2008 are:

  • Workers aged 22 and over, 5.73 an hour
  • Workers aged 18-21, 4.77 an hour
  • Workers aged 16-17, 3.53 an hour

http://www.direct.gov.uk 

For example, you are entitled to receive the minimum wage if you are:

  • employed by an agency
  • a home worker
  • a part-time worker
  • a casual worker
  • a pieceworker
  • a worker on a short-term contract

However, you are not entitled to receive the minimum wage if you are:

  • a worker under school leaving age
  • genuinely self-employed
  • some apprentices
  • an au pair
  • in the armed services
  • a voluntary worker

You should not be taxed at all if you are a student and earning under a certain amount. For any further details, including how to complain if you are paid less, visit the tax authority's website: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/nmw.

Rules for International Students
International students with a valid student visa have freedom to work in the UK for 20 hours a week during the term time and full time during your holidays, work placements and internships. These limitations don’t apply to EU and British national students. For working in UK during studies please click here. For all update and detail information please visit: http://www.ukcosa.org.uk  * Students from European Economic Area (EEA) do not need permission to work in the United Kingdom. EEA countries included are Austria, Republic of Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, UK, Belgium, Denmark, France, Greece, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Malta, Norway, Spain, and Switzerland. However, if you are a national of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia or Slovenia, you might need to register your work under the Worker Registration Scheme. For more information please visit working in the UK website at: http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk

Government Checks on discrimination
Discrimination at work means not treating employees equally and it could be of various forms. According to law your employer can�t discriminate against you on the basis of following factors:-  Such as:

  • Gender
  • Race
  • Colour
  • Age
  • Nationality
  • Ethnic background
  • Religion or belief
  • Sexual orientation
  • Marital status
  • Gender reassignment
  • Disability
  • Pregnancy

The 1976 Race Relations Act makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against you on racial grounds. Race includes:

  • Colour
  • Nationality
  • Ethnic or national origins

The Race Relations Act protects all racial groups, regardless of their race, colour, nationality, and religious beliefs, national or ethnic origins. Part-timers have the same legal rights as full-timers, this means that no employer can discriminate against you for only working a few hours a week.

Read More:

*For more on discrimination at work please visit: http://www.direct.gov.uk
*For more on working in the UK please visit official website: http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/workingintheuk
*All these information are correct at the time of writing and they are subject to change. Please let us know if you find any outdated information on this page to help us to help others. Please write us on  admin@helpingstudent.com with the Page reference and the information you think are outdated or wrong. Thanks - Editor Helping Students Ltd

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